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Posted on 02-20-2017

Treating Opioid Addiction with Suboxone

Advanced Spine discusses battling opioid addiction with our medical treatments.

Treating Opioid Addiction with SuboxoneIf you or a loved one is suffering from opioid addiction, you will certainly want to look into the various types of treatment options that are available to you. One of these options is to treat the addiction with narcotic replacement therapy. While there are a few options available for narcotic replacement therapy, Suboxone has been a successful option for many who suffer from opioid addiction.

What is Suboxone?

The commercial name for buprenorphine combined with naloxone, Suboxone is an opioid antagonist that was developed in response to concerns regarding buprenorphine abuse. While buprenorphine is less addictive than methadone, some users were still abusing buprenorphine by injecting it or snorting it in order to get high. By adding naloxone to the mix, users are no longer able to feel the effects of buprenorphine when Suboxone is injected. Furthermore, if it is crushed and snorted, the naloxone blocks the pleasurable sensations associated with buprenorphine.

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How is Suboxone Used?

To further reduce the potential for abuse, Subxone has recently become available as a film. The medication is also used as just one aspect of a rehabilitation program, which must address the physical aspects of opioid dependence as well as the emotional, personal and social ramifications of the disease. As such, an opioid addiction program should include behavioral modification and counseling to address the underlying issues of the addiction while the Suboxone helps you to stay physically comfortable while in the early stages of recovery. The drug will also help to block your cravings for heroin or other street opioids, which will help to reduce your chances of having a relapse as you gradually and safely reduce your dependence.

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