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Posted on 04-25-2017

Heroin: What is it and Why is it Addictive?

Advanced Spine and Rehab Discusses How to Overcome Heroin Addiction with Suboxone Treatments

Heroin addiction is a serious issue for many people throughout the country. As an opioid, heroin belongs to the same family of drugs as prescription medications such as oxycodone, hydrocodone and codeine. Each of these drugs helps to relieve pain by binding to opioid receptors in the brain in order to increase pain tolerance, decrease the body's reaction to pain and to reduce the intensity of pain. In the case of heroin, the drug enters the brain and is converted into morphine. It then binds to the same opioid receptors as prescription opioids.

Contact Us for Suboxone Treatments

In its pure form, heroin is a white powder that can be snorted or smoked. Heroin that has been processed for injection is referred to black tar, a name that it gets because of the color of the drug after the impurities have been left behind from processing. Black tar heroin is sticky or hard rather than powdery like pure heroin or heroin that has been cut with other substances, such as sugar or starch.

Following the rush that occurs from taking heroin, the rush changes to a feeling of drowsiness accompanied by slower breathing, heart rate and mental function. These side effects along with the risks associated with overdose can lead to the loss of quality of life, permanent impairment or even death. For this reason, treatment of heroin addiction is essential.

Suboxone is one medication that can be used to help treat opioid dependence. Made from buprenorphine and naloxone, Suboxone fills the brain's opioid receptors without creating the same high that is associated with opioid use. As a benefit, using Subxone cannot be used to achieve the full opioid effect, thereby making it more difficult to abuse then methadone and other forms of medication-assisted treatment.

To learn more about Suboxone and how it can be used to treat opioid addiction, contact Advanced Spine and Rehab. We will be happy to discuss it with you further.

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